22.12.17

Latest News

My recent bad news is that I had a fall while enjoying a dance, but am now recovering from an operation by an excellent specialist, who has put a titanium plate in my broken wrist. It took an hour and a half, or so I was told. My memory of it was starting to watch a nurse cut off the stuff round my arm, then I was woken by the doctor who was holding his mobile phone to show me the Spanish version of The Amber Keeper, which he said his wife had bought. What a lovely man, and brilliant at treating hands. Fortunately, David was allowed to join me in the room we were granted to stay in, each of us with a single hospital bed. It also had a sofa, chair, TV and shower room. It was good to have him help care for me. Before the op I had various tests and a wonderful lady, Beatrix, directed me through the process and translated all Spanish into English for me. What a joy she was. I will hopefully be well soon after a restful Christmas

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My good news is that celebrating the coming publication of Peace in My Heart, I’ve had a short story in Love Sunday magazine. I also have an article – 10 Things I’d Like My Readers To Know About Me – soon to appear in Female First. I have also had an interview with Talk Radio, which will be coming out in January.


Right now I’m working on proofs of Girls of the Great War, using only my left hand. It is due to be published nest spring. Now it is time for me to relax over the Christmas holiday.

I wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

18.12.17

The Effect of Dreams Post War

Dreaming is said to be good for us. It helps us to relax and sleep well, so that we wake up refreshed. Freud claimed that dreams were an expression of our secret desires, allowing us to view the world, and ourselves, in a more positive light. They can rebuild our dented egos, replenish our own self-worth. And true dreams that we have when we are asleep, can actually resolve problems that our conscious mind has, some possibly caused by family, finance, health or work pressure. The process of dreaming can strip all those blockages away by getting right to the nub of the matter. Then we can hopefully wake up having found a peaceful resolution. Or we can discover, through our dreams, a way to deal with the source of our depression and worries in a rational way. Dreams also allow us to recall memories that have quite disappeared from our conscious mind, but are only a pleasure to us if they are happy ones. But dreaming of the reality of war would not have been easy.

In Peace in my Heart: soldiers and PoWs suffered badly from the traumas they’d experienced. Having returned from the war where he’d been held as a PoW, Donald has problems and no wish to speak of them. He was still living in the past, too authoritative, treating their sons and daughters like kids, even though they’d grown much older and more independent and were accustomed to making their own decisions now. And his dreams frequently turned into nightmares.

Cecily dreamed of her mother, loving to recall memories of her, and her hope to hear from the GI she’d fallen in love with. Her young sister Megan entirely blocked the past out of her mind, as the loss of her parents and all she’d endured as an evacuee had been too painful. All she dreamed of post war was organising her own life. Her mother, Evie, dreamed of finding her children and restoring their life as well as her own.

She must keep her family together

The war is over and Evie Talbert eagerly awaits the return of her three children from their evacuated homes. But her carefree daughters and son are barely recognisable – their education has been disrupted, the siblings split up, and the effect on them has been life-changing. Her son has developed serious behavioural problems and with her daughters, there’s jealousy and a nervous disorder that cannot be explained… 

Evie’s husband also has problems. Having returned from being in action, he suffers nightmares and fits of rage. He’s no longer the gentle, quiet man Evie married. Peace may finally be here, but Evie’s family is in shreds. Now she must rebuild a loving home to achieve the happiness she’s always dreamed of… 

You can Buy this book in WH Smith and other book shops, or on Amazon.

Amazon UK

Amazon US


5.12.17

Evacuation Of Children in WW2

It began the first day of September 1939 due to the threat of bombing. Parents were expected to pay 6s per week. Those who were not so well off were charged less and assisted by the government and people taking in evacuees were paid around eight shillings or as much as sixteen, according to the age and needs of the children. Billeting officers helped find them foster homes. Some sent out by Operation Pied Piper at the outbreak of war, involving over a million children being moved to the countryside within just a few days. More were sent in 1940 when the phoney war was over and bombing really started.

Indication of the official return was sent out in May 1945 but permitted until the war was completely over in the east. Not all children chose to come when instructed to do so. Megan, in Peace in my Heart, much preferred to stay with the landladies she thought of as their kind and caring aunts, having lived with them for three years. This was very often the case. Some children hardly recognised their parents, looking and feeling like strangers, not having seen them for years. This was often because they had little memory of their parents, felt they’d been neglected and abandoned, or simply loved their surrogate parents more. Coming home often didn’t seem much fun.

The parents were devastated when they found little show of affection from the children they’d badly missed. And many had lost loved ones for whom they were grieving. In this story Cecily and Megan discovered that their home had been bombed and had no idea where their mother was living, or even if she was still alive. Evie was, but finding her children was equally difficult, as was locating a new place for them to live. And when they found them, would they ever agree to come home and would they still love their mam and dad?

Settling in with their family after years away was never easy and adjustments had to be made by all. For some the place they’d been living during the war had been exciting, and they found it difficult to return to their previous life they considered more boring. Their personality too had changed as they’d gradually grown up with caring people in a different area. However, if they’d suffered problems as an evacuee, perhaps been overworked, neglected or abused, they ceased to trust anyone. Sometimes their class or religion could be considered wrong by their surrogate parents. Whatever problems they suffered could result in them feeling rife with stress and anxiety, depression or obstinacy. Nor had they any wish to discuss these problems with their parents, once they returned home, not wishing to recall what had happened. Evacuation had saved lives but in many cases did create yet more problems for the family.


The war is over and Evie Talbert eagerly awaits the return of her three children from their evacuated homes. But her carefree daughters and son are barely recognisable – their education has been disrupted, the siblings split up, and the effect on them has been life-changing. Her son has developed serious behavioural problems and with her daughters, there’s jealousy and a nervous disorder that cannot be explained…

Evie’s husband also has problems. Having returned from being in action, he suffers nightmares and fits of rage. He’s no longer the gentle, quiet man Evie married. Peace may finally be here, but Evie’s family is in shreds. Now she must rebuild a loving home to achieve the happiness she’s always dreamed of…

Available at WH Smiths and most book shops.


Amazon UK

Amazon US