18.12.17

The Effect of Dreams Post War

Dreaming is said to be good for us. It helps us to relax and sleep well, so that we wake up refreshed. Freud claimed that dreams were an expression of our secret desires, allowing us to view the world, and ourselves, in a more positive light. They can rebuild our dented egos, replenish our own self-worth. And true dreams that we have when we are asleep, can actually resolve problems that our conscious mind has, some possibly caused by family, finance, health or work pressure. The process of dreaming can strip all those blockages away by getting right to the nub of the matter. Then we can hopefully wake up having found a peaceful resolution. Or we can discover, through our dreams, a way to deal with the source of our depression and worries in a rational way. Dreams also allow us to recall memories that have quite disappeared from our conscious mind, but are only a pleasure to us if they are happy ones. But dreaming of the reality of war would not have been easy.

In Peace in my Heart: soldiers and PoWs suffered badly from the traumas they’d experienced. Having returned from the war where he’d been held as a PoW, Donald has problems and no wish to speak of them. He was still living in the past, too authoritative, treating their sons and daughters like kids, even though they’d grown much older and more independent and were accustomed to making their own decisions now. And his dreams frequently turned into nightmares.

Cecily dreamed of her mother, loving to recall memories of her, and her hope to hear from the GI she’d fallen in love with. Her young sister Megan entirely blocked the past out of her mind, as the loss of her parents and all she’d endured as an evacuee had been too painful. All she dreamed of post war was organising her own life. Her mother, Evie, dreamed of finding her children and restoring their life as well as her own.

She must keep her family together

The war is over and Evie Talbert eagerly awaits the return of her three children from their evacuated homes. But her carefree daughters and son are barely recognisable – their education has been disrupted, the siblings split up, and the effect on them has been life-changing. Her son has developed serious behavioural problems and with her daughters, there’s jealousy and a nervous disorder that cannot be explained… 

Evie’s husband also has problems. Having returned from being in action, he suffers nightmares and fits of rage. He’s no longer the gentle, quiet man Evie married. Peace may finally be here, but Evie’s family is in shreds. Now she must rebuild a loving home to achieve the happiness she’s always dreamed of… 

You can Buy this book in WH Smith and other book shops, or on Amazon.

Amazon UK

Amazon US


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